A Little Help From Aunt Sheri

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I was still in college when my sister Sheri gave me a gift. She had been a special education teacher for more than five years in a Michigan town before the stresses of the job combined with her CF struggles became too taxing on her body. The district in which she taught was a low-income area that housed a prison, and some of her students had parents or other relatives in that prison. The needs were great. Sheri’s heart was big and she was the perfect one to love and nurture these children while helping them learn.

Because her district didn’t have the resources that some wealthier areas have, Sheri invested a great deal of her own money and time into making materials to use with her students. Her creativity really shone through in a lot of what she made, and when she left teaching, she brought some of it home with her. She gave it all to me while I was in college preparing for my own teaching career. I was able to use her creations in my own classrooms and later, with my tutoring students as well.

This fall I acquired a new student…an extra special young five named Lucas. At conferences, his teacher mentioned that he could use additional practice with fine motor activities such as writing his letters and cutting. For several years now, Lucas has been asking when he would be old enough to be a tutoring student and this was the perfect opportunity to make extra practice at home exciting for him! I put together a program which included muscle strengthening and fine motor practice but also tasks I knew would be fun and easy for him to make it an enjoyable time for both of us. When I broke the news to him he was thrilled and proud to be old enough to come to my office like a big kid. And I was excited too! It’s been lots of fun to have these two loves of mine intersect. Lucas has been an enthusiastic participant.

I was also excited to take out some of Sheri’s creations that had been dormant for a while. I told Lucas all about how she had been a teacher and how she had made a lot of the tools we were using to learn. We keep a picture of her nearby while we work–a Christmas ornament she made with her students one year. I even found some fun animal pencils she and I had made together once and the cat pencil has become Lucas’s official tutoring pencil.

I wish that Lucas could have known Sheri and that she could have known him. Someday that wish will come true. But for now, I’m so grateful that she can still be part of his life, even in this small way, and that we can remember her together as we learn.

img_0985Lucas was one excited boy on the first day of tutoring! He even uses the outdoor entrance like my other students do. After all, he wants it to be official!

Coloring, cutting, matching, tracing. It’s all good.

Here we’re using some of Aunt Sheri’s materials! Lucas is holding her special pencil and ornament, working on more matching activities that she put together, and jumping on vinyl letters she cut out and labeled to blend sounds into words.

img_1535Today in tutoring we learned how to draw a cat. Perhaps Lucas didn’t inherit Sheri’s natural artistic abilities, but I think they’re great and I know she would have liked them too. 🙂

Sheri, thanks for the help! Your legacy lives on.

The Glory of Week Three

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Happy New Year a month late! I didn’t intend to let so much time pass between my last post and now, but things got extra busy with the holidays, and after…well, I just felt a little uninspired.  I suppose that sometimes I need a break, even from things that I greatly enjoy. I follow several CF blogs and when someone doesn’t post for weeks on end, I begin to wonder if they are alright. I hope none of you were concerned!

We had a wonderful holiday full of family time, fun, and relaxation. Here’s a few of my favorite photos from Christmas:

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Christmas morning!

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Lucas made Jaime a hat…

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And me a necklace 🙂

The new year started with a bang…in the form of a virus that hit me on January 2. Admittedly, it wasn’t my favorite way to ring in the new year. Unfortunately, Lucas caught my virus and missed a whopping four days of school the second week of the month. This virus made him sicker than he has ever been and seeing that made me very grateful for how well I weathered it.

I wrote in December about my uncommon cold and this virus progressed in the same way, except for one notable difference. My doctor was out of town when I got sick, and the day it became clear that I needed antibiotics was a Sunday. Because of these two factors, I was prescribed antibiotics by an on-call doctor who has never met me. To his credit, he listened carefully to me, allowed me to (respectfully) question his antibiotic choice, and even accepted my personal recommendation for what antibiotics I thought I needed (based on what I guessed my own doctor would have prescribed).  And I must say, I chose well for myself. I started to feel better after just a few doses. The one difference, though, is that this doctor prescribed me three weeks of antibiotics rather than two. I used to always get three weeks, but lately my doctor has been giving me just two weeks of treatment. Two weeks is sufficient to kick the infection, but three weeks is just so wonderful. I simply love week three.

That may sound strange, but week three of antibiotics is the closest thing I get to a vacation from CF. Of course I use that term lightly. I still have to do treatments and therapy every day. I still have to take a handful of pills with each meal. I still have 40% lung function. CF never really takes a break. But by week three of antibiotics, the infection is gone and my chronic levels of bacteria are lower than normal. Because of this, I produce less mucus and cough far less than I usually do, even at my healthiest. My chronic cough is hard on my body in many ways. When it vacates or lessens for a bit, my life becomes easier. Here’s a few things I noticed last week during week three:

Monday: I woke up earlier than usual and still felt rested. I breezed through my treatments in record time because there was so little coughing and so little mucus to clear. Lucas and Jaime hadn’t even left for school and work and I was already through my morning routine! What to do with all my extra time?!

Tuesday: I (almost) made it to my 9:45 am Bible study on time. That. never. happens.

Wednesday: I had so much free time after my speedy treatments that I decided to go for a walk in the morning. And run some errands. I picked up Lucas for school. I decided to run more errands with Lucas. Let’s hear it for energy!

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One errand was to buy a birthday gift for Lucas’s cousin. He can’t wait to give it to her!

Thursday: I had a friend over in the morning. No need to preserve my kid-free time after I knocked out my entire to-do list yesterday! My friend commented on my clean house. That’s right, a clean house at the end of the week!!  I picked Lucas up and after lunch, we decided to put up some new maps we bought for his room. Several hours later all the wall decor in his room was rearranged and re-hung. I had five hours of tutoring that evening, but who needs to rest when it’s week three!

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Lucas is thrilled with his world map and US map (behind). He can start teaching me geography now.

Friday: CF decided to remind me of its presence this morning. In all my productivity yesterday I forgot my digestive enzymes at one meal. I spent the morning feeling sick to my stomach, but I was still able to get out for a brisk walk before I picked up Lucas, because #weekthree.

Saturday: I took my last dose of antibiotics. It felt a bit sad to bid farewell to my security blanket. I knew I would have a few more days of feeling better than usual, and with that in mind, I headed out for a walk. I surprised myself by powering through 2.5 miles in 38 minutes.

Sunday: I decided to do as much as possible to get into good shape before the adjustment phase hits and went out for another walk. I got through three miles in 48 minutes. Not bad!

Monday: Week three was technically over but I still felt great. A former student texted me and asked for an emergency tutoring session before an exam. Tacking on two extra hours of tutoring didn’t seem like a big deal so I agreed. (This just in…she aced her test!)

Tuesday: Week three’s extra energy was still fueling my fire so I decided to write a blog post on top of my Bible study and tutoring today. And here I am 🙂  I’m thankful for week three and for each day of feeling strong and energetic. I’m learning to enjoy these days as a gift rather than focusing on the fact that they won’t last.

Because they won’t. I know that things are going to get more difficult in the next few days. I also know that I’ll get through it and adjust to my normal once again. It will mean longer breathing treatments, earlier nights, later mornings, less productivity, more coughing, and more exhaustion. I’ll have to start over on my running goals and pace myself throughout the day. But it’s still a wonderful life–my own wonderful life. And God always supplies the grace and strength that I need. The glory of week three is behind me but there are blessed and happy days ahead!

Conversations with Lucas, Part Five

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It’s time for another installment of Conversations with Lucas! I hope they bring a smile to your face 🙂

L: Mommy, am I holding my pencil right?

B: Yes Baby, that’s right.

L: Oh thank you! That fills my heart with joy!

[Mine too.]

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L: Mommy, no one is allowed to touch the cell phone tower. No parents and no kids. But I am.

B: Oh, do you have special privileges?

L: No, I have gloves.

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L: Daddy, I want you to read this book! [Points to The Three Little Javelinas by Susan Lowell]

J: Oh, the Three Little Javelinas.

L: Dad?

J: Yes?

L: Would you please stop speaking Spanish and read it the way Mommy does?

*

[Lucas, singing a song from church]

J: Lucas, if you know the songs we’re singing during church you can always sing along!

L: I know, but do you know why I wasn’t singing at church, Dad?

J: No, why?

L: I was waiting for the part where we eat the bread and dip it into that cup.

B: Oh, communion!

L: Yeah, I love that part.

B: Me too. Does it make you feel close to God?

L: Yeah, well, it’s just that being at church makes me really hungry.

*

L: Mom, do you know what?

B: What?

L: You and I have belly buttons.

B: True…

L: But Daddy doesn’t have a belly button.  Daddy has a belly hole.

*

L: Daddy and I are your husbands!

B: Well, Daddy is my husband and you are my son.

L: But we both take care of you and that’s what husbands do!

B: Yes, you’re right, but sons can help take care of their moms too.

L: Okay, I’m your five-year-old son and husband helper!

*

L: Mommy, Henny’s not playing in today’s soccer game.

B: Oh, that’s too bad.

L: Yeah, she has an attitude.

B: Uh oh!

L: Mommy, what’s an attitude?

*

L: Mommy, you feel warm.

B: I do?

L: Yeah.  Your skin is so warm it feels like the fur of a fox.

[He knows this because of all those foxes he’s touched?]

*

[Riding the bus to the hospital]

B: We’re going to pass your old preschool in a minute! And then we’ll pass by Aunt Ede’s work.

L: Then where, Mommy?

B: Then we’ll be on our way to the hospital.

L: Wow! You know almost everything!

*

B: Honey, can you please sit at the table while you’re eating? You’re making a big mess.

L: But Mommy, I can’t just sit still! I need a lot of exercise!

*

J: Did you have fun even though you didn’t want to go?

L: Yes! It was so fun!

J: I had fun too even though I didn’t want to go either.

L: But Mommy did.

J: Yeah, she was right. We should probably just listen to Mommy.

L: Yeah, girls know the right thing to do. They have better ideas than boys.

*

B: I have something to tell you. You and I are going to get a flu shot today.

L: NOOOO!!!

B: But wait, I didn’t tell you the good part yet. Daddy got the movie Inside Out for you from the library and we can watch it when we get home as a “thank you” for being brave and getting the shot.

L: Okay, I guess I’ll go.

[After surviving the shot and both watching and loving the movie…]

L: Mommy I really appreciate this.  Thanks so much for getting me that shot!

B: Um, you’re welcome?!

L: Next time I get a shot, I’ll say to the doctor, “Thank you for the shot.”

[We’ll see about that :)]

*

L: Mommy, I’m going to tell you a story.

B: Okay!

L: Once there was…[story continues for a good, long while].

B: Wow, that was quite a story!

L: Did you like it?

B: Yes…

L: Good! Because I’m going to do it again, but this time I’m gonna sing it.

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Thanks for all the smiles, funny boy.

A Health and Exercise Update

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Friday, September 9th was clinic day for me. It had been three months since I’d been in to see my CF doctor. That means that for the past three months, I’ve felt good enough that I didn’t need any visits outside of my routine check ups. I really like my doctor and I’m pretty sure he likes me too, but we were seeing way too much of each other over the winter months.

I didn’t feel too nervous leading up to the appointment, not until right before my breathing test. Then sure enough, I felt my heart rate start to rise. There are just so many nerves when it comes to that test. I have felt healthy and strong all summer which is the most important thing, but you just never know what that FEV1 number will be. It’s hard not to be anxious.

In the end I scored a 39%. It would have been great to see a big jump since I’m feeling far stronger and healthier than I did three months ago when I scored 38%, but I’ve been through this enough times to moderate my expectations. It didn’t go down so we’ll call it a success!

Everything else checked out great–my heart rate returned to normal after the test, my oxygen saturation was good, my lungs sounded clear, and my blood pressure was normal. All good signs of health. My doctor was very pleased with how I was doing and was especially happy to hear about my exercise tolerance which he reminded me (again) was just as if not more important than what my FEV1 says. He also brought to my attention that in spite of several illnesses over the winter, my FEV1 stayed stable during and after the illness and didn’t dip like it did with my struggles in the winter of 2015. Stability is a wonderful, wonderful thing when you struggle with a chronic and progressive disease like CF. I am so grateful.

Which brings me to my next update–Operation Lace Up! A few months ago I wrote that I had achieved my goal of running two miles without stopping but I intended to work on diminishing the amount of time it takes me to get through those two miles. At the time I was running them in about 26.5 minutes.  Well…I’m still running them in about 26.5 minutes. I did start working on reducing my speed as planned, but I found that when I pushed myself even a little bit harder, I was getting over tired and not having energy for the other things I wanted to do. I took a step back and reevaluated my goal. I decided to continue to run two miles three times per week at the slower pace and to shoot for increasing my overall level of activity by getting 10,000 steps or more every day (which my Fitbit measures), workout days included. The summer is a great time to be active, and specifically this summer, I had a lot of work I wanted to do on the exterior of the house after being bitten by the Clean Window Perspective bug. I had areas in the yard I wanted to spruce up and Jaime and I decided this was the summer to paint our house.

I’m sure I don’t have to tell you that yard work and painting are physically challenging to someone with reduced lung function, but I love doing these types of jobs! The sides of our house and the perimeter in the back were overgrown with weeds, so I set out to clear the weeds and move rocks from the back to the sides where they could be more useful for weed management. I’m not done yet, but things are shaping up nicely.  Here are a few photos…

 

You maybe wondering what Lucas was up to while I was doing all this work. As you can see, he helped us paint (for a few minutes) but it took some creativity to keep him occupied most of the time. I put up a tent which I filled with books for him, turned on the sprinkler, even filled a snow sled with water. (Think portable bathtub).

Working outdoors (and going back indoors a hundred times to get the other book or bath toy that Lucas wanted) really racked up those steps! So far I have been successful with my goal and am on a 75-day streak of getting 10,000 steps or more. I feel like this increased level of daily activity has improved my energy and stamina which I’m very happy about. Fall is here now and winter is coming, so I’m sure it will be more difficult to keep it up from here on out. But I’m up for the challenge 🙂

Another 20-Year Anniversary

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The year 1996 was a big year for me. It was the year Jaime and I started dating. It was the year I graduated from high school. After graduation, I turned 18. In the fall I headed off to college. There were lots of milestones!

There was another big event for me in August of that year. The first weekend, I went to meet the girl who was to be my roommate for my Freshman and Sophomore years of college.  I remember having a stomach ache on Sunday that weekend. Thursday of that week that I wrote in my journal about abdominal pain and fevers. Friday morning I had an allergy appointment and my mom took me even though I was ill, feeling that perhaps the allergist could shed some light on my condition given her medical background and expertise. Once we got there she began examining me and when she touched my abdomen, pain surged through me. I shot up off the table, surprising all three of us. She knew right then it was probably my appendix and rushed me across the hall to where my physician had his offices. Within a few hours I was in surgery.

These days, appendectomies are often done laproscopically, but 20 years ago, we weren’t even presented with that option. We were hopeful, however, that the procedure would be routine and I would be out of the hospital after a few days. That was not meant to be. Once I was in surgery, they found that my appendix was hugely swollen and had perforated. Infection had spilled out into my abdomen and infection and scar tissue were clinging to my large and small intestine. They had to remove portions of both intestines as well as the appendix.

At the time, it was also determined I had a mild case of bronchitis. Out of concern for my lungs, the doctors decided it was best not to put me fully under for the surgery. The exact details are fuzzy in my mind, so I turned to my journal to fill in the details. There I reported that they gave me a spinal injection but I was partially aware during the surgery. Apparently I was lashing out and hitting at the doctors and nurses. They gave me a shot after the surgery to help me to forget. I did forget the surgery itself but had nightmares for months after the procedure as my subconscious tried to wrestle with the horror I had been through. (Side note: if you hit medical personnel during surgery, however justifiably, they will label you “combative” and that term will follow you around for the rest of your life!)

The first memory I have post-surgery is being wheeled from the elevator into my room. I thought I was screaming and writhing in pain, but was told later that I was in fact deathly still and softly moaning. I wanted to die. I had never, ever felt such a degree of pain and misery and it seemed unbearable. My second memory is of my parents and two of my sisters arriving at my room with a big bunch of balloons. I remember the shocked looks on their faces when they saw me. I remember my mom rushing to my side, and the others leaving immediately. The next two weeks were the most difficult of my life up to that point. I was discharged from the hospital after several days only to be readmitted due to uncontrolled pain and swelling. The infection took a long time to get under control. I became undernourished and unable to eat. Weight melted from my frame. The surgeon, skilled but callous, implied that I was anorexic because I wouldn’t (couldn’t!) eat. He also blamed me for the seriousness of my condition, deciding I must have withheld information from my parents about how I was feeling. He didn’t take into consideration that CFers have stomach pain routinely which makes it seem normal and also builds a pain tolerance that is perhaps higher than average. The staff seemed annoyed and threatening when I pulled my NG tube out in my sleep on the second night. Nothing was going right. It was an awful experience.

There were good things that happened too–Jaime came to visit me and brought me a cheerful stuffed Tigger. My sisters and dad came to visit regularly. My aunt and grandfather came. People sent flowers and little gifts to cheer me up. And my long-suffering mother stayed by my side most of the time, fielded phone calls from me in the middle of the night when I was despairing, and read to me to help pass the time. One day she read these verses from 2 Corinthians 1:

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves receive from God. For just as we share abundantly in the sufferings of Christ, so also our comfort abounds through Christ. (v. 3-5)

Those verses meant a lot to me during those weeks and the time of recovery that followed. It was the first time in my life that I was in real trouble. I was dealing with an infection serious enough to cost me my life. I was being cared for by a surgeon who was unkind and unfair. I was due to leave for college and didn’t know if I’d be strong enough to go. The future felt uncertain. And yet I felt God’s comfort deeply, perhaps for the first time. I found joy in knowing that this comfort I had received could be used to help someone else. It was the first time I personally grappled with the notion of redemption–that God could take a painful and ugly experience in my life and bring good from it. And He did bring forth many good things. I felt forever marked by God’s love and care for me during those days. I learned that life is indeed uncertain and disaster can strike at any time, but that God is a sure and steady anchor and can see us through any storm. I had a new understanding of what real pain was which made me appreciate all the more Christ’s sacrifice for me on the cross. My faith was deepened. I understood a little more about how much my sister Sheri had suffered with her CF and I felt compassion and respect for her.

I also had new eyes through which to see the pain and suffering around me, and once I got to college just weeks later, I found that hurt was rampant in people’s lives. I had friends who were scarred by abusive pasts, friends who were struggling with depression, and those simply looking for acceptance and love from a cold, hard world. I found I could relate to them a little better, and I felt deep sadness for the wounds that were ongoing, unable to be fully healed by the passage of time.

Although I thought my wounds were fully healed, years later, we discovered that this surgery was a big player in the infertility I was experiencing. In an exploratory procedure, our reproductive specialist discovered that my abdomen was full of scar tissue from the appendectomy and was it creating a mess of things. And unbeknownst to us, one of my fallopian tubes had been removed and tied off, a detail the surgeon failed to mention back in 1996. While the infertility was painful and difficult, it was another formative time in my life where I learned to trust God and accept His plan for me. In a spectacular show of redemption, Lucas was born on August 9, 2011–the 15th anniversary of that dreadful surgery. His birth on that day reminded me that our hurts do not go unnoticed by God. He sees, He knows, and if we allow Him to, He works all things together for our good, no exceptions. What a miracle.

That experience 20 years ago marked my transition from childhood into adulthood. It was a time of major growth for me. It was also the first of several times where I was in real danger and God preserved and protected my life. After that I knew without a doubt that He had a plan and a purpose for me. I knew that my life wouldn’t be perfect–couldn’t be perfect in a world so marked by pain and suffering. But I also knew that He would be my faithful guide and companion, and that He would provide whatever I needed. And He has. Great is His faithfulness.

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Five Years Old

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Five years old. I’ll just give you a moment to let that sink in. Okay, maybe I’m the only one who needs a moment. But honestly, the last five years have passed at lightening speed! Four was a great age, and I’m guessing five will be equally wonderful. So while I feel a little sad, I’m excited for what’s next too.  Here are some things that make Lucas the wonderful and unique little guy he is at age five:

  • Lucas wants to be a farmer when he grows up. He loves farms and we visit our local petting farm weekly. He calls himself Farmer Lucas when he helps me harvest vegetables from our garden. He spends many hours a week playing with his toy farm and has slowly added onto it using popsicle stick structures and cardboard boxes to get it to closely resemble our local farm. His absolute favorite farm animals are chickens! He does an amazingly accurate imitation of both a hen and a rooster. He crows like a rooster whenever he sees that Jaime has fallen asleep on the couch, which is a very effective tool for rousing him.
  • Lucas’s other great love is soccer, much to his father’s delight. He went to nearly every Detroit City FC soccer game with Jaime this season and learned all the songs and chants. He also loves watching soccer on TV. His favorite team is Manchester United (which he calls the red team) and his favorite player is Maroune Fellaini whom he also calls Crazy Hair. Lucas watches the live and televised games very closely and imitates what he sees in our backyard. He doesn’t call it the backyard however–it’s simply “The Field.” He got his first real pair of soccer shoes a few weeks back and now wears them every time we play.
  • Lucas is very creative in his play. He found a way to combine his two favorites and built a soccer field in his barnyard complete with a sideline and bench. The animals face off at least once a day. The star player is Henny. He likes me to sit in the “stands” and sing all the songs from the Detroit City games over and over (and over) while the animals play. Apparently it is against stadium rules to lay down during the game, stretch, yawn, or otherwise appear any less than 100% engaged at all times. After the game the animals talk to their coach in a huddle before they line up to shake hands.
  • Lucas has three favorite bedtime stories presently: The Mitten by Jan Brett, The Mitten by Alvin Tresselt, and The Hat by Jan Brett. He told us one day that he wanted to read the stories and we were shocked when he recited all three, word for word while turning the pages at the proper times. After memorizing the stories he put them to good use by finding a large mitten (which was mine once upon a time) and repurposing it as his toy mitten to act out the story with his animals. In Tresselt’s version of the story, the mitten rips apart and sadly, the seams have popped on my pair too after hours of being stuffed with a menagerie of plastic animals. Ah well, it was worth it for the hours of happy play.
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The Mitten!

  • Lucas is still very affectionate and loving.  He tells us multiple times a day that he loves us and likes us. He gives us lots of hugs and kisses. Every day he asks Jaime, “How was work today, Daddy? What did you do?” and similarly he’ll ask me, “How was tutoring, Mommy?” followed by a relevant question such as, “Did [insert student’s name] wonder where I was?” or “Did you see [insert student’s name] today?” It makes us feel special that he asks. I don’t know why, it just does.
  • Lucas knows all the names of the roads near our house and likes to give us detailed (and accurate) directions before we head out. He has two favorite roads, favored because they both have deer signs which he loves. He even knows the name of the service drive that connects them. He has conceptually figured out how the roads and highways near us line up which has surprised and impressed me on more than one occasion. “If you keep going on this road, Mommy, you’ll cross over the highway and end up at the farm!”
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Deer sign!

  • He still loves orange. All orange, all the time. He also still loves singing, and breaks into song often. He’s taken to asking us, “Who wants a song?” and then serenades us with a song of his choice. Most recently, he’s deviated from children’s music and asks to listen to Jaime’s music and my music while riding in the car. While I have edified him with wholesome selections, Jaime has learned the hard way that Lucas memorizes lyrics quite quickly, so it’s a good idea to know yourself what they actually say. I’ve had to do a little damage control. “Silly Lucas, not drugs, bugs.” Jaime is grounded until further notice.

I could go on, but suffice it to say, we love our boy immensely and have greatly enjoyed watching him grow from that teeny baby to our big five-year-old.

Happy Birthday Sweet Boy. We love you so much!

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Conversations with Lucas, Part Four

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We love this silly boy and are so thankful for him and for all the joy he brings to our lives. He loves to laugh and he sure makes us laugh! Sometimes he does it on purpose by telling jokes or repeating things he noticed we found funny in the past. Sometimes it’s just the combination of his sweet face, his little voice, and the way his mind works that has us in stitches.  Here are a few of our recent conversations. We hope they make you laugh too!

B: Who is going to go first?

L: I know! “Eenie, meanie, miney, mo, kitchen tiger by its toe.”

B: Kitchen tiger?

L: Yeah. You go first Mommy.

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L: Mommy, can we have quesadillas for dinner?

B: Well, it’s Father’s Day so we’ll let Daddy pick what he wants for dinner.

L:  Okay.  But when is it Kid’s Day?

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L: Mommy, when is Daddy going to be home?

B: He’s on his way.

L: I want him to be home now!

B: Okay, well, if you count to 100, then he will be home.

L: Okay!  10, 20, 30…

B: Hey!

*

L: Mommy, will you make my lunch now?

B: Sure, but let me lay down for two minutes, I’m tired.

L: But I’m not tired!

B: That’s because you’re a strong, young boy and I’m an old lady.

L: You’re a mom, not a lady.

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L: Mommy! Come see my farm! But you have to call first to see if it’s open.

B: Okay…ring ring…

L: Hello?

B: Hi, I was wondering if the farm was open so I could come and see the animals?

L: I’m sorry, you have the wrong number. This is the doctor’s office.

*

[At lunch time…]

B: Hey, there’s a family of lions on my chair, I can’t sit down!

L: It’s okay, Mommy.

B: It’s okay to move them?

L: No, you can eat somewhere else. Or you can stand.

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L: I don’t want to!

B: I know you don’t, but sometimes you just have to obey Mommy and Daddy. It’s hard when it’s something you don’t like, but Mommy and Daddy have to obey too.  We have to obey God.

L: But who has to obey kids?

*

L: Mommy, soccer players fall a lot.

B: That’s true, sometimes they trip or bonk into each other.

L: Yeah, you fall a lot in soccer but you don’t fall in golf. Only if you’re wearing the wrong pants.

*

L: Daddy, Mommy and I have been talking.

J: Yeah?

L: Yeah. You are really forgetful, but we love you anyway.

*

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Thanks for all the laughs, little one. We love you.